Asthma? And breathing problems

Go down

Asthma? And breathing problems

Post by JustAGirl on Sun Nov 21, 2010 1:05 pm

Hi..
I have asthma, and when i was in school i had to stop doing P.E because i found it hard to breathe after running.. or any other exercise.
Even when i do horse riding i get out of breathe!
I have inhalers Smile And i take them when i get out of breathe, they help quite a lot Smile
Asthma has really changed my life though :/ x
avatar
JustAGirl
Crazy as a donkey!
Crazy as a donkey!

Posts : 15
Join date : 2010-11-21

Back to top Go down

Re: Asthma? And breathing problems

Post by Beth@admin on Mon Nov 22, 2010 10:41 am

Hiya, i have friends with asthma, and it has a massive affect on what they can and can't do..
could you go to the doctor and talk to them about it?
Maybe they could give you some good ideas to help with your breathing when you are having trouble Smile
x x x x

________________________________________________________
[center]You leave a lot when everyone changes and leave you alone
You shoudn't change for other people, stay yourself and people will like you for who you really are! Like a Star @ heaven

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow.
Don't walk behind me, I may not lead.
Walk beside me and be my friend Very Happy
[/center]

To get through the hardest journey we need take only one step at a time, but we must keep on stepping! I love you

-Here to help, feel free to email me sunny

avatar
Beth@admin
I am too cool for school!
I am too cool for school!

Posts : 91
Join date : 2010-10-08
Location : London, United Kingdon

Back to top Go down

Re: Asthma? And breathing problems

Post by believe-in-me on Sat Dec 04, 2010 11:33 am

You just have to take your inhalers whenever you get out of breath Smile it should help and then you should be able to carry on with whatever you were doing Smile Good luck
avatar
believe-in-me
Crazy as a donkey!
Crazy as a donkey!

Posts : 15
Join date : 2010-10-10

Back to top Go down

Re: Asthma? And breathing problems

Post by Maud58 on Mon Dec 26, 2011 4:07 am

In normal breathing, air flows more or less freely into and out of the lungs. During an asthma attack, however, airway linings swell, muscles around the airways tighten and constrict, and the airways of the lungs become clogged with mucus. The end result is episodes of coughing, wheezing, and breathlessness, with a suffocating sense of never being able to get enough air.

What Causes Asthma?

Asthma attacks can be brought on by many things, including stress, exercise, respiratory infections, irritating smells, pollen, smoke, dust or dust mites, mold, mildew, certain kinds of food, and so on. A study (1994) in The American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine seems to show that “gas stove exposure” increased asthma symptoms and resulted in more visits to the emergency room. The findings seem to suggest that those with severe asthma should avoid gas stove cooking.

Though theories abound as to what causes asthma, there is no real consensus. Some years ago, scientists thought that petroleum-based pollutants might be a major cause, but this theory is no longer in favor since asthma cases are surging while pollution levels are said, at least by some, to be declining. One of the latest theories is that genetics are involved. Researchers at the Lawrence National Laboratory in California say they have recently isolated two genes that they believe contribute to asthma.

One recent and unusual theory has to do with the increasing hygiene of modern life. This theory states that since babies are less exposed to viruses and bacteria than they were in previous generations, their immune systems do not develop fully. These researchers point out that people who live in rural areas or on farms—people who are much more likely to be exposed to organisms in the soil—are much less likely to get asthma than those who don’t. Recent studies (2003) seem to confirm these findings.

Chronic Hyperventilation

Another intriguing theory, this one coming from Dr. Konstantine Pavlovich Buteyko in Russia, and this one seemingly offering a cure, claims that asthma is really just the result of bad breathing habits, especially “deep breathing." What Buteyko seems to actually mean by "deep breathing" is "over breathing." When we inhale and exhale too much air too quickly, says Buteyko, we lose too much carbon dioxide too quickly. We hyperventilate. This fast loss of carbon dioxide causes the various airways to clog and tighten, and also makes it difficult for the oxygen in our blood to reach the cells of our brain and body. Buteyko tells us that the symptoms of asthma are simply the body’s way of attempting to slow down the loss of carbon dioxide. His cure? Breathe less.

Buteyko and his instructors cite their high incidence of success in helping people reduce or even eliminate both their symptoms and their medications through their methods as proof that they are right. But their logic seems a bit flawed. Clearly, one can influence asthma through good breathing habits. One can also influence asthma through specialized breathing techniques that help increase carbon dioxide in the body to normal levels. But this reduction of symptoms does not prove that asthma is caused by not breathing a certain way, any more than reducing asthma symptoms through medication proves that asthma is caused by not taking the right medication. And it certainly does not prove that "deep breathing" is the culprit behind asthma, especially since many of us in today’s stress-filled world, including asthmatics, are unable to breathe fully and deeply in the first place. The fact is, many people who "over breathe" do not get asthma, though they may, indeed, eventually wind up with other health problems.

Nonetheless, Buteyko is clearly right about "over breathing." When we breathe too much air for the needs of the moment—that is, when we "over breathe"—we are actually hyperventilating. And chronic hyperventilation does indeed have many negative health consequences, including a constriction of the airways. Related to this increasing phenomenon of "over breathing" is the fact that more and more people today breathe frequently through their mouths. Unless one breathes very slowly, breathing through the mouth, especially on exhalation, is associated with a rapid loss of carbon dioxide. Asthmatics must learn to breath through the nose, and this may require special breathing practices.

Maud58
Welcome Me, I'm New!

Posts : 4
Join date : 2011-12-26

Back to top Go down

Re: Asthma? And breathing problems

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum